What is the Transportation Standard?

The Transportation Standard of the AODA requires transportation service providers to make the features and equipment on routes and vehicles accessible to passengers with disabilities.

The Transportation Standard requires transportation companies to inform the public about accessible equipment and features on their vehicles, routes and services. They must provide this information in accessible formats upon request. Furthermore, when accessible equipment is not working, companies must find other ways to accommodate passengers. They must also ensure that the equipment is fixed as soon as possible. Moreover, companies must train workers and volunteers to:

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/what-is-the-transportation-standard/

Individual Transportation Plans for Students with Disabilities

Under the Transportation Standard of the AODA, school boards must create and implement individual transportation plans for students with disabilities.

An individual transportation plan is a written plan detailing how a student will travel from home to school and back again. Individual transportation plans make sure each child gets to and from school in the way that is best and most safe.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/individual-transportation-plans-for-students-with-disabilities/

Canada Accedes to the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

The Government of Canada is working to create a truly accessible Canada. Today, as part of these efforts, the Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility, along with the ministers of Justice, Foreign Affairs and Canadian Heritage, announced that, with the support of all provinces and territories, Canada has acceded to the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Accession to the Optional Protocol means that Canadians will have additional recourse to make a complaint to the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, if they believe their rights under the Convention have been violated.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/canada-accedes-to-the-optional-protocol-to-the-united-nations-convention-on-the-rights-of-persons-with-disabilities/

CRTC Mandates Standards for TTY, IP Relay Accessibility Messaging Services

Individuals who are deaf, hard-of-hearing or deafblind will soon have access to faster, better message relay services

Canada’s telecommunications watchdog has issued a decision mandating standards for message relay services.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/crtc-mandates-standards-for-tty-ip-relay-accessibility-messaging-services/

Mentally Disabled Win Class Status Over Loss of Services at Age 18 in Ontario

By Colin Perkel
The Canadian Press, December 14, 2018

TORONTO A lawsuit alleging the Ontario government has been arbitrarily making thousands of mentally disabled people wait indefinitely for provincial government supports after they turn 18 was certified as a class action on Friday.

In his decision, Superior Court Justice Edward Belobaba agreed the plaintiff had made a strong enough case to allow the as-yet untested claim to proceed to trial on its merits.

“The plaintiff’s complaint is not about inadequate funding or the need for a greater allocation of governmental resources but about the negligent utilization and administration of existing resources,” Belobaba wrote in his decision.

Accessibility News December 15,2018 Update

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Inclusive Media and Design Inc is a proud supporter of Accessibility News.

Inclusive is ready to caption and video describe all your video for web, DVD, and computer desktop. They can also assist you in understanding and implementing Ontario’s AODA Integrated Standards’ media requirements. Consider having them check that any of your new web site content is compliant with an Accessibility Audit.

Visit http://www.inclusivemedia.ca to find out more.

The AODA Clock is Ticking

There are 6 years, 2 weeks, 4 days until a fully Accessible Ontario! Will you be compliant?

In this Issue

Airline Fined for Separate Disabled-Accessible Website

Offering a separate website for those with disabilities does not comply with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) website accessibility requirements, the agency made clear with a $200,000 fine to the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS).

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/airline-fined-for-separate-disabled-accessible-website/

Accommodating Workers with Epilepsy

The Employment Standard under the AODA requires employers to accommodate workers with disabilities. This article will specifically look at accommodating workers with epilepsy and outline the kinds of accommodations workers might need.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/accommodating-workers-with-epilepsy/

Accessible Information at Work

Under the Employment Standard of the AODA, employers must provide accessible information to workers with disabilities through accessible formats or communication supports upon request.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/accessible-information-at-work/

Return to Work Plans for Ontario Workplaces

The Employment Standard under the AODA states that all public sector organizations, and private or non-profit organizations with fifty or more workers, must develop and document a process for writing return to work plans.

Return to work plans are written documents that provide support for workers who have been absent from work because of a disability and who need disability-related accommodations when they return to work. Workers can have return to work plans if their illness or injury is not covered by the return to work process under a different law, such as the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB).

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/return-to-work-plans-for-ontario-workplaces/