In Their Own Voices

Hope Technology School gives autistic students a new way to be heard.

On the same street as Stanford University, in Palo Alto, Calif., is another school you’ve probably never heard of: Hope Technology School. Hope Technology’s student body comprises a mix of disabled and nondisabled students in grades
pre-K through eight. Many of the disabled students are autistic and often have difficulty verbalizing even basic needs.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=1803

Regina Mom Pushes for Accessible Playground

CBC news, Wednesday, November 24, 2010

A Regina mother is encouraging the city to build a new wheelchair-accessible playground.

Cindy Leggott, who uses a wheelchair to get around, wants to see an accessible playground built near Jean Vanier Elementary School.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=1816

Full ccessibility in Kerr Hall ‘Just Impossible’

23 November 2010
RyeACCESS
By Mariana Ionova, News Editor

For Ryerson students using a wheelchair, getting to a class in Kerr Hall could be dangerous and nearly impossible. The ramps leading to the entrances are too steep, the doorways are too narrow and the pavement is cracked and heaved.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/?p=835

AODA Alliance Asks McGuinty Government to Report on its Efforts on Unkept 2007 Election Promises

On November 12, 2010 we wrote to Community and Social Services Minister Madeleine Meilleur, the McGuinty Government’s cabinet minister with lead responsibility for implementing the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. We asked
what the Government has done up to now, and what it plans to do in the final year of this term in office, on three important 2007 election promises to Ontarians
with disabilities, namely:

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/?p=833

Private Member’s Bill Aims to Better Protect Service Animals and Police Dogs

By Angela Hall,
Leader-Post, November 22, 2010

Legislation proposed by Saskatoon Centre NDP MLA David Forbes would, if passed, make it an offence to interfere with a service animal.

Stephen Kaye once worked with a police dog who died while trying to disarm and subdue a subject.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=1814

Diane Finley Responsible for Disability Has Inaccessible Office

Monday, 15 November 2010 14:35
Written by Stephen Pate

Ironically Federal Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Diane Finley has inaccessible constituency office 

Bob Speller, Liberal candidate in the Haldimand-Norfolk riding, blasted Federal Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Diane Finley for having an office that is not wheelchair accessible.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=1808

AODA Alliance Calls on Elections Ontario to Provide Internet and Telephone Voting and More Than One Accessible Voting Machine Per Riding in the October 2011 Ontario Election

On November 18, 2010, the AODA Alliance wrote Chief Electoral Officer Greg Essensa, who has lead responsibility for administering provincial elections in Ontario. For the October 2011 Ontario election, we ask him to exercise his authority under new amendments to the Election Act, to provide more than one accessible voting machine per riding, and to provide internet and telephone voting. We request this to overcome barriers facing voters with disabilities who cannot mark their own paper ballot and verify their choice. See this letter, below, and an earlier letter from the Chief Electoral Officer to the AODA Alliance on elections accessibility.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/?p=830

Mall cop tries to eject boy’s service dog

A Brandon, Man., woman says a security guard at a local shopping centre gave her son a hard time over his service dog.

“On the bottom – on both sides – it says she’s a hearing dog,” Joanne Wilkinson told CBC News, pointing out a bright red harness that shows the
animal is a service dog and not a pet.
Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=1806

Children with autism in Ontario face an uphill battle when seeking provincially funded treatment, reports Pauline Tam

By Pauline Tam, The Ottawa Citizen November 22, 2010   

It has been more than two years since five-year-old Jackson Halden was diagnosed with autism and put on a waiting list for provincially funded therapy.

In that time, his parents, like many others in the same situation, have opted to pay for the treatment themselves. Knowing that the earlier children start therapy, the better, Dan Halden and Jude Pattenden maxed out their credit cards and relied on donations from relatives.

Accessibility News November 20, 2010 Update

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