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Sticking with Red and Green Transit Lines ‘Offensive’ to Colour-Blind People, Says Advocate

OC Transpo is using two colours to differentiate the Confederation Line LRT and Trillium Line. It might cause problems for people who have a red-green colour blindness, an advocate says.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/sticking-with-red-and-green-transit-lines-offensive-to-colour-blind-people-says-advocate/

How Do Deaf-Blind People Communicate?

Deaf-blind people have many different ways of communication.
The methods they use vary, depending on the causes of their combined vision and hearing loss, their backgrounds, and their education.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/how-do-deaf-blind-people-communicate/

Blind Man Sets Out Alone in Google’s Driverless Car

A blind man has successfully traveled around Austin unaccompanied in a car without a steering wheel or floor pedals, Google announced Tuesday.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/blind-man-sets-out-alone-in-googles-driverless-car/

City Committee Approves Changes to Transit Subsidies

The Chairperson of London’s Accessibility Advisory Committee, Roger Khouri, spoke out in favour of keeping the subsidy for the blind.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/city-committee-approves-changes-to-transit-subsidies/

Your quiet hybrid is likely to make itself heard in the not-so-distant future

Under a new safety regulation issued by the federal government, hybrids and electric cars will be equipped with a device that emits sound to alert passersby that the vehicle is running. Manufacturers have until Sept. 1, 2019, to meet the requirement.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/your-quiet-hybrid-is-likely-to-make-itself-heard-in-the-not-so-distant-future/

Elections Report Discriminates Against the Blind!

The Parliamentary Committee released its report “Strengthening Democracy in Canada : Principles, Process and Public Engagement for Electoral Reform” last Thursday only in pdf which it knew was unreadable by blind electors.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/elections-report-discriminates-against-the-blind/

BRITISH COLUMBIA: Passenger Transportation Board Approves Use of Soft Meters for Taxi Industry with Mandatory Voice Output

Soft meters are tablet based meters which rely on GPS technology to calculate the fare for a given trip. While the total faire is still based on time and distance, the consumer advantage of soft meter technology is the fact it eliminates any possibility of driver tampering with the meter and provides a detailed printed receipt for each fare when the trip is completed.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/british-columbia-passenger-transportation-board-approves-use-of-soft-meters-for-taxi-industry-with-mandatory-voice-output/

The World Blind Union: Future Challenges and Opportunities

We discussed access issues, including the challenges presented by the increase in the use of shared spaces; limitations in web accessibility; the danger of silent cars; the need to make books available in accessible formats and more. We discussed education and employment, but the 2016 General Assembly was more than a time to meet and plan; it was a time to encourage and inspire one another. At the General Assembly there were blind people helping blind people; blind people sharing their ideas and experiences; and blind people lifting one another’s confidence and expectations.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/the-world-blind-union-future-challenges-and-opportunities/

Proud to Be Blind

by Penny Leclair

Is the idea of being proud of yourself new to you? How about being proud of the fact that you have a disability or that you can eat anything without getting sick?

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/proud-to-be-blind/

Blind Ottawa Man May Resort to Begging to Cover Care Costs for Service Dog

Hugh Adami, Ottawa Citizen, April 1, 2015

Bruce Boyd does without a lot of things – like a new pair of winter boots to keep his feet warm and dry, and food that would give him much-needed protein.

He does so to hold onto his service dog, Ziggy, a dear companion who gets him around safely.

If he has to start begging on the street to pay for some of his dog’s needs, so be it, says the 59-year-old Boyd, who is blind and suffers from hepatitis C as a result of a blood transfusion during eye surgery in 1980.