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Additional Regulation Isn’t Necessary to Resolve the Issue of Fake Service Animals

Editors Note: While this article refers to the US it can easily be applied in Canada.

News stories across the nation continue to report an increase in the number of people who pretend that their pet dog is a service animal. The major concern stems from the unruly behavior of these supposed “service animals”, and how their presence jeopardizes the safety and access rights of legitimate service animal teams.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/ditional-regulation-isn%c2%92t-necessary-to-resolve-the-issue-of-fake-service-animals/

Levelling the Playing Field

The role of accommodations in academia

Lakehead, like all other universities and businesses in Ontario, is required to comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). If you’ve had a job in Ontario at any point in your life, you’ve likely been told about the AODA along with other standard workplace trainings like WHMIS. When you’re sitting through these often monotonous training days, it can be easy to lose sight of the relevance of these policies to our daily lives. However, as midterm season is upon us, one university policy relating to the AODA may become more prominent: accommodations.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/levelling-the-playing-field/

Wynne Government Still Hasn’t Appointed an Education Standards Development Committee, Fully 314 Days After Premier Wynne Pledged to Create an Education Accessibility Standard under Ontario’s Disabilities Act

and

Last Day to Complete the Wynne Government’s Online Survey about Disability Barriers in Ontario’s Education System

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/wynne-government-still-hasnt-appointed-an-education-standards-development-committee-fully-314-days-after-premier-wynne-pledged-to-create-an-education-accessibility-standard-under-ontarios-disab/

Canada’s First National Accessibility Law Should Be Ready by Next Spring: Hehr

The federal minister responsible for crafting Canada’s first national accessibility legislation says the law should be ready by next spring and should benefit not only people with disabilities, but their caregivers.

Kent Hehr says the timeline for the new law has shifted slightly since he took over the portfolio for sport and persons with disabilities in a recent cabinet shuffle.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/canada%c2%92s-first-national-accessibility-law-should-be-ready-by-next-spring-hehr/

Win the war on talent: Hire people with disabilities

In this second part of a five-part series, experts from the Ontario Disability Employment Network explain why HR should tap this talent pool.

Demographic studies suggest a looming labour shortage is on the horizon. According to Statistics Canada, the first of the country’s baby boomers reached the age of 65 in the year 2012, and by the end of this decade most boomers will retire from the workforce.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/win-the-war-on-talent-hire-people-with-disabilities/

Local Man Wants Law to Regulate Service Dogs

“The accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 doesn’t currently include legislation that defines proper training and accreditation for service animals’

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/local-man-wants-law-to-regulate-service-dogs/

Making a Home Accessible Can Make All the Difference as We Age

Sandra and Dan Sexton are doing the kind of work on their North York home that usually comes much later in life.

Although they are only in their 40s, an ALS diagnosis for Dan means the home will have to become entirely accessible, as he transitions from using a walker to eventually an electric wheelchair. The Sextons are planning to offer housing to Dan’s 82-year-old father as well, which will feature a new lower-floor bath with wide doors, a roll-in shower and a widened side entrance to accommodate the wheelchair.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/making-a-home-accessible-can-make-all-the-difference-as-we-age/

FDNY Violates ADA by Pre-judging Veteran Applicants as Unfit

New York Disability Rights Advocates (DRA), a national nonprofit legal center, filed a Charge of Discrimination for Julio Andrade, a former Marine, after the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) denied him a job as a Fire Fighter because of a diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) he received at the time of his honorable discharge from service in the Iraq war, approximately 8 years earlier.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/fdny-violates-ada-by-pre-judging-veteran-applicants-as-unfit/

How an Ottawa Cancer Patient is Trying to Make CHEO More Accessible for Everyone

Just before the elevator doors opened at CHEO, Sarah Telford playfully, but pointedly, picked up a nearby yellow caution cone the kind that warn of wet floors, spills and whatnot and placed it in front of the elevator. When the doors opened, the elevator’s lone occupant, hospital CEO Alex Munter, was compelled to negotiate his way around the obstacle as he exited, no small feat considering that he was in a wheelchair.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/how-an-ottawa-cancer-patient-is-trying-to-make-cheo-more-accessible-for-everyone/

EU One Step Closer to Accessibility Act as MEP Mizzi welcomes EP vote

The European Accessibility Act, which seeks to bolster existing accessibility requirements for products and services, was voted through the European Parliament yesterday. The Act must be approved by the EU Council before becoming law.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/eu-one-step-closer-to-accessibility-act-as-mep-mizzi-welcomes-ep-vote/