Accessibility News August 10,2019 Update

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The AODA Clock is Ticking

There are 5 years, 20 weeks, 5 days until a fully Accessible Ontario! Will you be compliant?

In this Issue

*Biomedical Engineering Students Design Life-Changing Technology
*Feeling Waves for First Time: Floating Wheelchairs Big Hit on P.E.I. Beaches
*Ontario Should Move Faster on Tearing Down Barriers
*A New Toronto Star Editorial Blasts the Ford Government for Moving So Slowly on Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities and Echoes the AODA Alliance’s Objections to Doug Ford’s Diverting 1.3 Million Dollars to the Rick Hansen Foundation’s Problematic Private Accessibility Certification Program
*Proactive Communication in Healthcare is Needed
*Could Assistive Tech Transform the Social Care Sector?
*’No No No No No No’: Wheelchair Users Say Even Accessible Taxis Will Refuse Rides in Vancouver

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Inclusive is ready to caption and video describe all your video for web, DVD, and computer desktop. They can also assist you in understanding and implementing Ontario’s AODA Integrated Standards’ media requirements. Consider having them check that any of your new web site content is compliant with an Accessibility Audit.

Visit http://www.inclusivemedia.ca to find out more.

ARTICLES:

Biomedical Engineering Students Design Life-Changing Technology

The University of Manitoba Biomedical Engineering Design Team (BMED) brings together students with a passion for the biomedical field to foster design experience, device building, public speaking and networking opportunities.

Throughout their first year as a team, BMED organized events, tours and outreach programs to distribute knowledge about biomedical engineering. The team
focused on completing autonomous design projects that aim to improve the quality of life of clients. Within these projects, students designed, prototyped and tested their devices before taking them to competitions and conferences. BMED worked on three projects: Wheelchair Transfer, Wheelchair Handwarmer, and EMG Muscle Rehabilitation.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/biomedical-engineering-students-design-life-changing-technology/

Feeling Waves for First Time: Floating Wheelchairs Big Hit on P.E.I. Beaches

For the first time in her life, 26-year-old Meghan Hughes has been able to feel what it’s like to have waves wash over her, thanks to a floating wheelchair at Cedar Dunes provincial park.

The floating chairs are provided at four P.E.I. provincial park beaches including the park at West Point, P.E.I. That’s where Hughes, who’s visiting from Windsor, Ont., recently took her first ride into the ocean.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/feeling-waves-for-first-time-floating-wheelchairs-big-hit-on-p-e-i-beaches/

Ontario Should Move Faster on Tearing Down Barriers

As accessibility advocates constantly warn, we’re all just one illness or accident away from becoming disabled.

And with 1,000 Ontario baby boomers turning 65 every day, more of us will be dealing with aging vision, hearing, hips and knees that will impact our quality of life and make our physical environment more difficult to navigate.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/ontario-should-move-faster-on-tearing-down-barriers/

A New Toronto Star Editorial Blasts the Ford Government for Moving So Slowly on Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities and Echoes the AODA Alliance’s Objections to Doug Ford’s Diverting 1.3 Million Dollars to the Rick Hansen Foundation’s Problematic Private Accessibility Certification Program

The August 6, 2019 edition of the Toronto Star includes a powerful editorial. It slams the Doug Ford Government for spending 1.3 million dollars on the problematic private accessibility certification program offered by the Rick Hansen Foundation (RHF), when the Government should act more strongly and swiftly to speed up the sluggish implementation and enforcement of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). That editorial can be found below.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/a-new-toronto-star-editorial-blasts-the-ford-government-for-moving-so-slowly-on-accessibility-for-ontarians-with-disabilities-and-echoes-the-aoda-alliances-objections-to-doug-fords-diverting-1-3-m/

Proactive Communication in Healthcare is Needed

Currently, the AODA does not have a healthcare standard. A committee is making recommendations about what a healthcare standard should include. In the meantime, however, there are still AODA requirements for healthcare providers to follow. The Information and Communications Standards have regulations
that apply to healthcare providers. When providers follow these requirements, they make healthcare settings more accessible to patients, workers, and visitors with disabilities. Communication in healthcare applies to service in:

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/proactive-communication-in-healthcare-is-needed/

Could Assistive Tech Transform the Social Care Sector?

Learning disability charity Hft has partnered with Tunstall Healthcare, a specialist in connected healthcare solutions, to release a new report on how assistive technology can support and transform the social care sector.

The report looks at the untapped potential of assistive technology and how it can support disabled people, increase independence and free up carers to focus on more meaningful support. It also highlights how assistive technology could help bridge the disability employment gap and get more disabled people into work.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/could-assistive-tech-transform-the-social-care-sector/

‘No No No No No No’: Wheelchair Users Say Even Accessible Taxis Will Refuse Rides in Vancouver

Two weeks ago, Gabrielle Peters spent a rare day out in Vancouver with friends. They took in a cultural festival in the afternoon, then headed for dinner at a restaurant Peters had always wanted to try.

“As soon as we sat down, my anxiety started. In the back of my mind was, ‘I’m going to have to call a taxi,’ and that’s likely to be not a good experience,” she remembered.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/no-no-no-no-no-no-wheelchair-users-say-even-accessible-taxis-will-refuse-rides-in-vancouver/

eSSENTIAL Accessibility: helping organizations reach, serve and empower people with disabilities.

The eSSENTIAL Accessibility assistive technology app? gives those who have trouble typing, moving a mouse, or reading a screen due to a variety of conditions – such as stroke, paralysis or arthritis – the tools they need to navigate the Web. The app is free to the end-user and simple to use.

Organizations that feature the app on their websites are committed to making it easier for people with disabilities to access information online.

For more info, please visit http://www.essentialaccessibility.com Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/essentia11y or connect with us on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=59891 .

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The views and opinions expressed throughout Accessibility News do not represent those of the various organizations or associated individuals and are exclusively those of the contributor and/or author of the specific article or commentary.

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