Return to Work Plans for Ontario Workplaces

The Employment Standard under the AODA states that all public sector organizations, and private or non-profit organizations with fifty or more workers, must develop and document a process for writing return to work plans.

Return to work plans are written documents that provide support for workers who have been absent from work because of a disability and who need disability-related accommodations when they return to work. Workers can have return to work plans if their illness or injury is not covered by the return to work process under a different law, such as the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB).

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/return-to-work-plans-for-ontario-workplaces/

Gretzky Bill Targets Supports for Adult Children With Disabilities

Windsor West MPP Gretzky confident her proposed legislation will be passed
Graphic: / Lisa Gretzky; Dan Janisse / Michelle Helou, left, with son Noah, and Mary Beth Rocheleau with son Gregory, at a news conference Friday where MPP Lisa Gretzky talked about her new private member’s bill – Noah and Gregory’s Law – that seeks to eliminate wait times for those with developmental disabilities.;

When Windsor’s Gregory Rocheleau turned 18 last month, there was cake and a celebration – but his passage into adulthood also triggered behind-the-scenes tears and panic for his single-parent mom.

“Deep down inside, I was very sad. I felt overwhelmed,” said Mary Beth Rocheleau.

Students Are Exposing The University Of Guelph For Abandoning Students Dealing With Mental Health Issues

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Students claim the school offers the worst mental health support in all of Ontario.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/students-are-exposing-the-university-of-guelph-for-abandoning-students-dealing-with-mental-health-issues/

Accessibility News December 8,2018 Update

Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/acnewsca

Inclusive Media and Design Inc is a proud supporter of Accessibility News.

Inclusive is ready to caption and video describe all your video for web, DVD, and computer desktop. They can also assist you in understanding and implementing Ontario’s AODA Integrated Standards’ media requirements. Consider having them check that any of your new web site content is compliant with an Accessibility Audit.

Visit http://www.inclusivemedia.ca to find out more.

The AODA Clock is Ticking

There are 6 years, 3 weeks, 4 days until a fully Accessible Ontario! Will you be compliant?

In this Issue

Raise Public Transit Accessibility Barriers at the December 13, 2018 TTC Public Forum on Accessible Transit

and – The AODA Alliance Sends the Ontario Government a Written Submission for the Provincial Consultation on Education in Ontario

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/raise-public-transit-accessibility-barriers-at-the-december-13-2018-ttc-public-forum-on-accessible-transit/

Excellent Toronto Star Article Reports on Our Call for Canada’s Senate to Hold Public Hearings and Amend the Weak Bill C-81, the Proposed Accessible Canada Act

Page A-3 of the December 4, 2018 Toronto Star included a great report on our call for Canada’s Senate to hold public hearings early in 2019, and to amend the weak Bill C-81. That bill is the Federal Government’s proposed Accessible Canada Act. We set out the Toronto Star article below.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/excellent-toronto-star-article-reports-on-our-call-for-canadas-senate-to-hold-public-hearings-and-amend-the-weak-bill-c-81-the-proposed-accessible-canada-act/

In the Legislature Yesterday, the Ford Government Refused to Lift Its 168-Day Freeze on Standards Development Committees that Were Working on Recommendations to Remove Disability Barriers in Ontario’s Education and Health Care System

Yet Two Years Ago Tomorrow, It Was the Tory Party That Had Demanded in the Legislature that Ontario Create the Very Education Accessibility Regulation that the Ford Government Has Now Frozen Work on Developing

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/in-the-legislature-yesterday-the-ford-government-refused-to-lift-its-168-day-freeze-on-standards-development-committees-that-were-working-on-recommendations-to-remove-disability-barriers-in-ontario/

On The International Day for People with Disabilities, December 3, the AODA Alliance Calls on the Senate to Amend the Weak Bill C-81, the Proposed “Accessible Canada Act” After the Trudeau Government Voted Down Key Amendments in the House of Commons

A tenacious Ontario-based disability rights coalition, the AODA Alliance, unveils its plans to take a campaign for Canada to enact a strong national accessibility law to Canada’s Senate! The proposed “Accessible Canada Act” which the House of Commons passed last week, is too weak to achieve its goal of making Canada barrier-free for over five million people in Canada with disabilities. Therefore the Senate needs to hold public hearings next year, and to make key amendments that the Trudeau Government blocked in the House of Commons, according to the AODA Alliance, a non-partisan Ontario disability coalition.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/on-the-international-day-for-people-with-disabilities-december-3-the-aoda-alliance-calls-on-the-senate-to-amend-the-weak-bill-c-81-the-proposed-accessible-canada-act-after-the-trudeau-governmen/

Breakfast Message: People With Disabilities Don’t Need Lip Service, They Want Opportunities

The executive director of Independent Living Sudbury Manitoulin has a message for business owners: please hire more people with disabilities.

“What I’d like to say is give that person with a disability an opportunity,” said Rob DiMeglio, speaking to Sudbury.com at the 10th annual Persons with Disabilities Breakfast Nov. 30.

Read more at
https://aoda.ca/breakfast-message-people-with-disabilities-dont-need-lip-service-they-want-opportunities/

Child Support Ordered In Precedent-Setting Case Involving Adult With Disabilities

By Laurie MonsebraatenSocial Justice Reporter
Thu., Sept. 13, 2018

It is the final chapter in a constitutional challenge that changed provincial legislation and gives new hope to single parents caring for children with disabilities.

An Ontario court judge has awarded Brampton single mother Robyn Coates monthly payments of $518.14 in child support for her disabled adult son for the rest of his life.

Robyn Coates launched a constitutional challenge of Ontario’s child-support law on behalf of son, Joshua, 23, shown near their Brampton home.

The support ruling, released by Justice William Sullivan last week, stems from a precedent-setting decision in July 2017 that prompted the provincial government to change the law and opened the door for unmarried mothers and fathers caring for adult children with disabilities to claim support from estranged parents.