Microsoft Commits to Improving NZ Accessibility

The Save as ‘DAISY’ add-on, which is now available, allows users with limited vision to convert files such as Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint documents into compatible software for Braille readers, as well as reading the file aloud and giving the user the option to save files in the DAISY format, converting them into an accessible multi-media format.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2405

Helping Businesses Become More Accessible

Milloy says that the strategy is about thinking things through and coming up with better solutions to problems faced by those who are disabled.

“Businesses will see a value in wanting to make changes,” he said. “It can be a win-win situation for everyone. The legislature has some bite to it, but we are here to help not to fine people.”

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/?p=1628

Tip Sheet: Helping Employees With Disabilities Stay Safe

As an employer, you want to keep your employees safe. Ontario’s Accessibility Standard for Employment can help you do that.

Does this apply to my organization?

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/?p=1625

An Inaccessible Website: Don’t Just Suck it Up

The Disability Discrimination Act in Australia includes web accessibility.

Speaking up about inaccessibility on the web is the only way to change it, writes Sarah Pulis from Media Access Australia.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2399

B.C. Program Offers Independence to People With Intellectual Disabilities

Callan Parker has what some people call a “diversability.” Born with Down’s Syndrome, Ms. Parker has grown into an 18-year-old fashionista with a passion for dancing, Facebook and pop singers such as Hilary Duff.

But like many people her age, she’s at a crossroads. High school is over and the path to a job and independent living is uncertain. The roadmap is getting clearer, though.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2397

Accessibility News December 17,2011 Update

Inclusive Media and Design Inc

Inclusive is ready to caption and video describe all your video for web, DVD, and computer desktop. They can also assist you in understanding and implementing Ontario’s AODA Integrated Standards’ media requirements.

Visit www.inclusivemedia.ca to find out more.

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In this Issue

*Meeting the Customer Service Standard (CSS): Restaurant Menu
*Attention AODA Organizations: Actions to Complete by January 1, 2012
*Keep Sweet, Gimps
*National Federation of the Blind Urges Swift Action on Recommendations for Accessible Higher Education Materials
*Aging in Place: How to Remodel Your Home and Stay as Long as Possible
*Air Canada to Face Class Action Suit from Obese
*The Smartphone Revolution: Accessible To All

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Attention AODA Organizations: Actions to Complete by January 1, 2012

Author: Suzanne Cohen Share

January 1, 2012, is the date to complete all actions required under the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service and emergency preparedness requirements in the Integrated Accessibility Standards. The good news is, if your organization is obligated to report, you do not have to file with the government until December 31, 2012.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/?p=1622

Keep Sweet, Gimps

By Victor Schwartzman and Paul Caune

The ‘keep sweet’ mentality could also come from a combination of classic Canadian politeness with the unstated public belief that citizens with disabilities are lucky to get anything.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2391

National Federation of the Blind Urges Swift Action on Recommendations for Accessible Higher Education Materials

If the report’s recommendations are not acted upon, however, students with disabilities will be put at a greater disadvantage than ever before in terms of access to educational materials.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2393

Aging in Place: How to Remodel Your Home and Stay as Long as Possible

There are plenty of wonderful senior living communities out there. But for many older adults, no matter how lovely the neighborhood and how terrific the services, a senior community isn’t the first choice—staying at home is.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2389