Accessibility News July 30,2011 Update

Inclusive Media and Design Inc

Inclusive is ready to caption and video describe all your video for web, DVD, and computer desktop. They can also assist you in understanding and implementing Ontario’s AODA Integrated Standards’ media requirements.

Visit www.inclusivemedia.ca to find out more.

—-

In this Issue

*The McGuinty Watch
*National Federation of the Blind Supports Blind Machinist in Employment Discrimination Suit Against Railroad
*AODA: Why Do I Have to Notify the Public When There is a Disruption of Services?
*Mental Health Courts Guide Offenders to Treatment, Not a Jail Cell
*The Accessibility Lesson Which My Co-Workers and I Learned During Dinner
*Flash Mob Project Creates Awareness of Environmental Sensitivities
*Prospects Brighten For Copyright Exception Treaty

National Federation of the Blind Supports Blind Machinist in Employment Discrimination Suit Against Railroad

In 2004, BNSF removed Mr. Hohn from his job as a diesel locomotive mechanic, claiming that his visual impairment put his and others’ health at risk on the job, even though there was no evidence that Mr. Hohn had difficulty on the job or had ever endangered himself or anyone else. Mr. Hohn has worked
safely in machinist positions for over three decades and has never suffered an injury because of his blindness.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2236

AODA: Why Do I Have to Notify the Public When There is a Disruption of Services?

In Ontario, under the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service, as of January 1, 2012, organizations are required to publicly notify customers of temporary disruptions of services or facilities or if they are expected to be temporarily unavailable in the near future, including the steps to take to access alternative methods. This includes planned as well as unplanned service disruptions. Any disruption of services or facilities that people with disabilities need to access your products or services requires proper notification. You will provide a description of alternative facilities or services if they are available.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/?p=1298

Mental Health Courts Guide Offenders to Treatment, Not a Jail Cell

KIRK MAKIN — JUSTICE REPORTER

Peering at Ontario Court Justice Leslie Chapin from the prisoner’s box, Christopher Parkinson took less than a minute to escalate from simmering anger to bellicose fury.

“Cut me a little bit of respect and tell me where I’m going to be sleeping tonight,” yelled Mr. Parkinson, one of a stream of petty offenders paraded through
the city’s Mental Health Court one day last week. “You think this is funny?” he asked, before unleashing a stream of obscenities at the judge.

Most judges would have swiftly cited the wiry young man for contempt of court and sent him off to jail. But Judge Chapin turned a kindly eye on Mr. Parkinson, who was charged with two counts of threatening death, and patiently explained the mechanics of obtaining bail.

The Accessibility Lesson Which My Co-Workers and I Learned During Dinner

I thanked the restaurant manager for what he and his staff had done and tried to do regarding accessibility, but I went on to point out
that without access to the restaurant’s menu, true accessibility did not exist.

I then asked the restaurant manager to think about how he would feel if he were in my shoes and if he had just learned that the restaurant either could not or would not spend the small amount of time and resources needed to produce a menu for him to read on his own.

Read more at
http://www.aoda.ca/?p=1296

Flash Mob Project Creates Awareness of Environmental Sensitivities

Having severe Asthma and trying to maintain a social life isn’t easy, but when you add the disability of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity to the combination, the challenges become even tougher.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2231

Prospects Brighten For Copyright Exception Treaty

The prospect of agreement on an international treaty to allow accessible versions of copyrighted works to be shared across borders, giving people with print disabilities wider access to books, has brightened following a recent meeting of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO).

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2229

Accessibility News July 23,2011 Update

Inclusive Media and Design Inc

Inclusive is ready to caption and video describe all your video for web, DVD, and computer desktop. They can also assist you in understanding and implementing Ontario’s AODA Integrated Standards’ media requirements.

Visit www.inclusivemedia.ca to find out more.

—-

In this Issue

*The McGuinty Watch
*Enabling Accessibility Fund
*DOJ Delays Web Accessibility Regulations
*Disabled and Reduced Mobility Airport Guide
*2010-2011 Annual Report celebrates 50 years of OHRC
*Draft Report Calls for Reduction of Suicide Stigma
*Psychiatric Survivors Continue to Fight Against the Stigma of Mental Illness
*AODA Alliance Writes Three Political Parties to Request 2011 Election Commitments
*Respectable Record Marred by Embellishment
*Interest Grows in ‘Virtual’ Schools
*Myths About Low Vision
*Accessibility Rules for New Builds Only
*Sault Transit to Conduct Review of City’s Parabus Service
*Keep Enhanced Caregiver Tax Credits in Mind
*System Failed Mentally Ill Teen

Enabling Accessibility Fund

The Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) supports community-based projects across Canada that improve accessibility, remove barriers, and enable Canadians with disabilities to participate in and contribute to their communities.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2225

DOJ Delays Web Accessibility Regulations

Earlier this month the United States Department of Justice admitted what many of us have suspected: we will not be seeing web accessibility regulations
in the United States for commercial and public entities any time soon. Some time in 2013 at the earliest.

Read more at
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com/?p=2221